Timor Leste Ermera - Organically Farmed Specialty Coffee

Timor Leste Ermera - Organically Farmed Specialty Coffee
$14.95

TIMOR-LESTE ERMERA

Region Ermera

Producer Fatubessi Forest Gardens

Process Washed 

Altitude 1400-1700 masl

Varietals: Typica & Timor

 

This delicious Ermera lot is a selection of Typica and Timor varieties, handpicked by some 160 women and men.

Like all Timor-Leste coffees, it is shade-grown and farmed organically by tradition Fully washed, sun-dried

and further hand-sorted to deliver a sweet, clean cup.

Flavour Profile

Dark Chocolate  •  Almond Nougat  •  Molasses  •  Plum sweet full bodied cup

 

This Ermera lot is a selection of Typica and Timor varieties, handpicked by some 160 women 
and men. Like all Timor-Leste coffees, it is shade-grown and farmed organically, by tradition.
Fully washed, sun-dried and further hand-sorted to deliver a sweet, clean cup.

 

Farm Details

In the 1920s on the island of Timor, a spontaneous mating of an Arabica 
and a Robusta plant was discovered in the forest gardens of Ermera district in the eastern
highlands. Observations showed this new variety had the hardiness and high yields of its
Robusta parentage, whilst exhibiting refined cup qualities owing to its Arabica make-up.
Decades of study and development saw the ‘Hybrid of Timor’ go on to be cross-bred with
Caturra to create Catimor varieties by 1967 - just in time to be introduced across the 
Americas and save those powerhouse coffee lands from being decimated by Coffee Leaf Rust 
(which straight Caturra is highly vulnerable to).
Meanwhile, for the promising coffee island, the Portuguese colonisation of the East was
replaced in 1976 by Indonesian annexation with the West. Civil unrest became perpetual,
a century-old coffee industry shrivelled up and infrastructures collapsed making exports
untenable. Independence was recognised in 2002, making Timor Leste the first new state
of the 21st century. The coffee sector made a sharp turnaround thanks largely to foreign
investment responding to the country’s obviously great natural potential. Today, coffee is the
country’s only cash crop, grown by about a third of all households and accounting for over
80% of total exports.
Unable to compete on the world stage for quantity, all efforts are poured into increasing
quality potential by way of training programs, improved infrastructure and land rehabilitation,
realising far higher income to farmers. Most recently, innovative processing techniques
are being well executed and turning specialty heads. With inspiring younger generations 
engaging proudly with their unique history and caring coffee culture, momentum towards 
exciting new profiles are sure to be realised in the near future.